Abortion pills and contraception: 1A: NPR

A photograph shows birth control pills at a health center that allow women to have abortions.

GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP via Getty Images


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GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP via Getty Images


A photograph shows birth control pills at a health center that allow women to have abortions.

GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP via Getty Images

Birth control and abortion pills are certainly not the same.

But millions of Americans worry about the future of the two now that Roe has been ousted.

More than half of all abortions in the United States are medically induced by a two-pill regimen that does not involve surgery.

The legal landscape around this process already involved a patchwork of different state and local policies. But now? It’s more confusing than ever.

And this confusion extends to the future of birth control, especially Plan B and IUDs. The majority opinion of the Supreme Court on the Dobbs decision does not cover contraception. But in a separate explanation of the decision, Judge Clarence Thomas called for a reconsideration of Griswold v. Connecticut – which protects access to contraception.

There is evidence that some Americans stockpile both abortion pills and emergency contraceptives. Amazon, CVS and other retailers have had to limit purchases of Plan B. Meanwhile, demand for abortion pills abroad has increased.

What is the future of contraception? What about the future of abortion pills? And with millions of people trying to access both without medical advice, what could that mean for their effectiveness and safety?

Julie Rovner, Dr. Nisha Verma and Katie Watson join us for the conversation.

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